Posts Tagged ‘google’

3 Key Takeaways from Google’s Planned AdWords Changes

By April 22nd, 2014

This morning, Google announced several new AdWords updates which will become available in the coming months. Vice President of Product Management Jerry Dischler made the reveal during the AdWords Performance Forum, where he reiterated Google’s mission to help advertisers “turn signals into stories,” and emphasized that “it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the consumer.”

Let’s take a look at their feature announcements in more detail:

1) Mobile App PromotionGoogle will focus on improving the ways in which advertisers drive mobile app installs, engagement, and conversions through AdWords.

AdWords mobile app promotionsChanges will include suggested keywords based on popular searches in Google Play, improved targeting options on the GDN, and deep linking in mobile app ads for users who have already downloaded an advertiser’s app.

Renewed emphasis on the mobile app space should come as no surprise. From a mobile usage perspective, the statistics are too glaring to ignore. While there have been more than 50 billion app downloads in Google Play across 190 countries, many advertisers still struggle to promote their apps and drive engagement post-download. In fact, some 60% of the available mobile apps on Google Play are never installed and over 80% of apps only get used once. According to eMarketer, more than 86% of mobile usage occurs via apps while only 14% occurs on the mobile web.

While Google was the first major advertising publisher to offer a mobile app install advertising solution (mobile app ad extensions), they’ve recently taken a backseat to Facebook. Approximately 18% of mobile app downloads now come from Facebook and Twitter, and many believe that social beats out search when it comes to app discovery and download. With these new mobile app promotion features, Google hopes to change that perception.

2) Intelligent Measurement Tools Google will focus on more intelligent measurement tools to help advertisers make the online-offline connection.

Last year, Google released Estimated Total Conversions. Marketed as a way to illustrate how Google search campaigns affect offline conversions, it also provides an estimated impact of advertising spend in one central location (AdWords). Today, Dischler announced additional tracking for offline conversions as part of this calculation. While his description of “offline conversions” was not specific, it will likely include in-store purchases.

This renewed focus on offline conversion tracking fits with Google’s aim to be a one-stop-shop for online advertising. However, advertiser concerns about sharing first-party data necessary for improved tracking still remain. Most advertisers prefer to keep most (if not all) of their first-party data out of Google’s reach due to privacy concerns. It will be interesting to see the adoption rate of this updated Estimated Total Conversions feature given the reluctance of advertisers to share offline data with Google.

3) Intelligent Tools for Power Users Google will focus on helping AdWords power users manage campaign complexities by adding a few sophisticated tools.

google adwords changes

Dischler recognized some current frustrations advertisers experience with AdWords, including the difficulty of completing large-scale bulk actions across campaigns. He called them “far too complicated” and acknowledged that many users currently go outside the interface and create complex spreadsheets to get the insight they need.

To address this pain point, Google will add functionality to help advertisers more easily upload, create and edit “hundreds” of Google advertising campaigns. In addition, AdWords users can expect new reporting, visualization and testing features in the AdWords interface. For example, advertisers will soon be able to drag and drop metrics into the UI to create pivot tables and easily manipulate reports “across multiple dimensions,” similar to what many do today within Excel. Through these “Intelligent Tools,” Google hopes to provide a way to handle reporting, analytics and optimization “all within AdWords.”

This is an exciting step for Google, but it’s important to note the data is Google-specific only, so advertisers will still need to go “offline” or to a third-party platform for comprehensive, cross-channel reporting. Furthermore, Google has historically struggled when it comes to reporting on actual revenue from purchase transactions. At best, Google will provide advertisers with revenue proxies and estimates which can be used for analytics and optimization.

A Note to Our Customers

At Marin, we see these newly announced Google features as a step in the right direction to help address gaps in the AdWords interface. The new features will initially be released in closed-beta, but we look forward to working closely with Google to integrate themas they become available in the AdWords API.

As the leading digital marketing platform and largest spender through the Google API, our mission to provide the industry’s best cross-channel marketing capabilities for advertisers remains the same. As always, we value your product feedback and look forward to receiving your comments.

Business as Usual After Google Announcement

By April 9th, 2014

Over the past couple days, you likely heard some alarming reports speculating on changes in how Google passes data to analytics software and advertisers. This understandably created lots of buzz, but today we have the facts as reported in Google’s official Ads Developer Blog:

“Today, we are extending our efforts to keep search secure by removing the query from the referrer on ad clicks originating from SSL searches on Google.com.

Advertisers will continue to have access to useful data to optimize and improve their campaigns and landing pages.  For example, you can access detailed information in the AdWords search terms report and the Google Webmaster Tools Search Queries report.”

Marin Software will continue to receive keyword data from Google. Conversion and revenue tracking, reporting,  and analytics will not be disrupted. Our CMO Matt Ackley explained, “As an AdWords API partner, Marin Software leverages keyword data – separate from search query data – in providing its market-leading analytics, campaign management and optimization capabilities.”

For customers leveraging Marin Tracker, Tracker will no longer be used as a source for keyword expansion. However, Marin’s Keyword Expansion tool will continue to bring in keyword suggestions via the publisher search query reports for both Google and Bing, which provide the majority of keyword suggestions today. If you’re using Tracker and have questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to your customer success team.

We look forward to business as usual, helping our customers to be the best marketers in the industry.

What Advertisers Need to Know about Google’s Upcoming Transition to Shopping Campaigns

By April 2nd, 2014

In February, Google Shopping campaigns became available to all advertisers globally. Shopping campaigns redefined the way retail advertisers manage and report on Product Listing Ads, offering additional flexibility, visibility, and control marketers truly appreciate. Though advertisers can continue managing standard PLA campaigns successfully, Google announced today that all advertisers must fully transition to Shopping campaigns by late August 2014. After this date, advertisers will no longer be able to manage PLAs through standard Search campaigns, and all remaining PLA campaigns will be automatically upgraded to Shopping campaigns. This transition, similar to enhanced campaigns, represents a challenge and opportunity for retail advertisers.

Google Shopping campaigns guide

What Do I Need To Do?

From now until the transition date, advertisers can continue managing and optimizing PLAs through standard Search campaigns. Since the auction landscape for PLAs was not affected by the introduction of Shopping campaigns or the mandatory transition, advertisers can continue running standard campaigns without adversely impacting PLA performance. Keep in mind Shopping campaigns and standard campaigns can run in tandem, ensuring the transition process can be executed successfully over time and according to retailers’ business needs.

How Do I Migrate?

There are five critical steps for transitioning to Google Shopping campaigns:

1. Prepare your feed for transition.
Review your product_type, adwords_labels, and adwords_grouping values. Products you plan to target as a group and bid on using product_type should have exactly the same value in the product_type attribute. Keep in mind that product types can only be subdivided five times.switching to Google Shopping

For shopping campaigns, adwords_labels and adwords_grouping attributes aren’t supported. The new custom_label attribute can be used instead; however it’s limited to five labels per product.

2. Plan your transition process.
Take time to plan out your transition and consider restructuring your PLA strategy according to best practices and business needs. For advertisers managing a large number of product targets, a phased transition schedule is recommended.

3. Create a Google Shopping campaign.
For a single transition, create a Shopping campaign and subdivide product groups based on performance and business needs, then pause the old PLA campaign.

For a phased transition, create a Shopping campaign and systematically subdivide high volume and top performing products; pausing old PLA targets as new objects are created in your new Shopping campaign. If new groups don’t map directly to existing targets, you’ll need to have both PLA campaigns active, setting the new Shopping campaign priority setting to “high.”

4. Subdivide products within your new Shopping campaign.
Keep in mind that advertisers get performance data at all levels for all products, regardless of how product groups are organized. However, since product groups can only be subdivided five times, how these groups are organized becomes very important. It’s recommended that advertisers subdivide product groups first by product attributes that support more granular, subsequent subdivisions. For example, product_type > brand > id.

5. Analyze and optimize.
As with any transition and migration, be sure to monitor performance and ensure all of your products are receiving consistent coverage and driving similar outcomes. Review and familiarize yourself with the new CPC and CTR benchmark metrics as well as impression share. These will provide insight into the auction landscape and enable you to make smarter decisions when optimizing bids and product groups.

For additional guidance, please review Google’s recommended steps for transitioning to Shopping campaigns and work with your solution provider to establish an appropriate timeline.

What’s Marin’s Timeline for Support?

A beta program for Google Shopping campaigns will become available well in advance of the transition date. General availability for campaign management, streamlined reporting, URL Builder functionality, and integrated bid optimization is scheduled shortly after the conclusion of the beta. For more information on Marin’s Shopping campaigns beta, release schedule, and transition plan, please contact your customer engagement and customer success teams.

3 Surefire Strategies for Driving Success with Remarketing Lists for Search Ads

By March 17th, 2014

Despite increasing complexity and competition, paid search advertising budgets are expected to work harder and drive more revenue than ever before. Unfortunately, marketers continue to struggle with driving relevancy and increasing engagement. For the most part, the challenge is that keywords, creative, and bid strategy remain the same for every search and every searcher. Remarketing lists for search ads (RLSA) address this challenge by enabling advertisers to optimize campaigns based on user demographics and behavioral attributes. Though the list of use cases for RLSAs is likely endless, here are three strategies used by Marin customers today that underscore the power and flexibility that RLSAs bring to any paid search program.

I Know Where You Clicked Last Session

A user who’s been to your website is more likely to convert in a subsequent visit. With RLSAs, you can increase ad visibility and continue driving customers down the purchase funnel by adjusting ad creative and bids for users who previously visited your website.

By adding visitors who navigated to deeper parts of your website, such as category and product pages, to remarketing lists, you can build highly targeted campaigns that rely on more relevant ads. Creative that include buying signals like “act now” or “buy today,” along with promotional offers, engage repeat visitors. Coupled with optimal bid adjustments, these strategies drive downstream conversions and revenue from visitors who are closer to the bottom of the purchase funnel.

Navigational Searches Cost $$$

Though there are benefits to bidding on brand terms—controlling brand messaging, combating aggressive competitors, increasing SERP real estate, and providing deep links via sitelinks—these tactics tend to address engagement with new customers, as opposed to existing ones.

Marin Software RLSAs

Marin Software RLSAs targeting

With RLSAs, you can effectively eliminate navigational searches by building lists for existing customers who are logged into their profile or account. These users are already paying customers or have converted into active profiles yet continue to click on paid ads to navigate to your website. This behavior ultimately results in wasted ad spend.  By integrating first-party, customer-oriented data into RLSAs, you can reallocate budget away from navigational searches in favor of targeting and engaging new users. This strategy is highly effective for subscription-based products and services.

Driving Repeat Customers

Soft goods and services are often repurchased and renewed. For instance, pet food might be purchased every month or an insurance policy renewed every six months. Understanding when customers are likely to become repeat customers enables you to leverage RLSAs to increase the lifetime value of your customers.

Marin Software RLSAs

For example, take a financial services company that requires customers to renew their subscription every quarter. With visibility into their first-party data, which includes subscription start and ends dates, this advertiser could generate two remarketing lists, one for recent subscriptions and another for upcoming renewals. Generating an RLSA for customers with recent subscriptions, the advertiser can decrease bids on expensive, generic keywords for these new customers. On the other hand, creating an RLSA for customers who are coming up for renewal, allows the advertiser to increase bids on those same keywords to increase ad visibility and drive renewals. This strategy enables advertisers to pay more for clicks that are more likely to convert and eliminate those that are less likely to convert.

A Few Things to Remember

As you start to think about how these strategies will benefit your paid search program, there are a few things you should keep in mind:

  • The maximum membership duration, or how long a visitor’s cookie stays on a list, for RLSAs is 180 days. Consequently, advertisers can’t remarket to a customer from last year, eliminating the ability to drive renewals for customers with annual subscriptions.
  • Don’t get too cute and clever with RLSAs. Since lists must have a minimum of 1,000 cookies (users) before they can be used, highly targeted strategies can fall flat in terms of effectiveness if the audience isn’t large enough.
  • Remarketing lists don’t include users who are signed-in to Google. *Sigh*

Are there other RLSA strategies that you’ve executed on with impressive results?

Getting to Know Google’s New “Shopping Campaigns”

By November 25th, 2013

Google, Shopping campaigns, PLAs, marin software, ppc, semLate last month, Google introduced Shopping campaigns, a new way for retail advertisers to manage and report on Product Listing Ads. While retailers can continue running regular Product Listing Ads campaigns, Shopping campaigns offer additional flexibility and visibility that advertisers will truly appreciate. This new campaign type is only available to a select number of retailers today;, however, it’s important to understand what the changes and benefits are before they’re generally available early next year.

How Do Shopping Campaigns Work?

By now retail search marketers know that Merchant Center data is critical in creating and managing Product Listing Ads. Shopping campaigns address this requirement by making all product data accessible within AdWords, removing the need to reference Merchant Center. Advertisers can now easily browse and organize their product inventory and make informed decisions about their advertising strategy within a single interface.

One of the biggest changes is the replacement of product targets with product groups. Product groups are used to select which products retailers want to bid on for a given campaign. There can be multiple product groups within a single campaign. Advertisers can subdivide inventory into customized product groups using any product attributes and the products that aren’t subdivided remain in an “Everything else” product group. Bids can then be calculated and set for individual groups.

Google, Shopping campaigns, PLAs, marin software, ppc, sem

What’s Changed?

Here’s what has and hasn’t changed:

  • Product Listing Ads are still Product Listing Ads: Ads appear in the same places, on the same networks.
  • Product groups, not product targets: Shopping campaigns are powered entirely by Merchant Center product data and products are organized into product groups using any combination of product attributes.
  • No more “AdWords grouping” and “AdWords labels”:  “AdWords grouping” and “AdWords labels” attributes no longer exist. If additional categorization is needed beyond product attributes, custom labels can be used.
  • New custom labels: Use the custom labels attribute to subdivide products. Create up to five custom labels per product in the Merchant Center feed and assign values to each label as needed.

What Are the Benefits?

There are four key benefits to using Shopping campaigns:

  • Increased Efficiency: Marketers can browse their product catalogue directly with AdWords and create product groups for inventory they want to bid on.
  • Greater visibility: Gain visibility into how individual products or categories of products are performing at any level of granularity.
  • Deeper Insights: Benchmarking data (CPC and CTR) provides insight into the competitive landscape. Furthermore, marketers can identify revenue opportunities with impression share data and bid more aggressively to remain competitive in the auction.
  • More Control: Assign priority to multiple Shopping campaigns (containing the same products) to determine which campaign and bids will be used when ads for those products show. Additionally, limit the products advertised using inventory filters, which leverage defined Merchant Center product attributes, like brand or product type.

Let us know your thoughts on Google’s new Shopping campaigns and how you think they’ll impact your PLA strategy for 2014.

Note: At this time, shopping campaigns are not supported via the AdWords API.

6 Best Practices for Mobile Optimized Enhanced Campaigns

By November 21st, 2013

The growth in mobile adoption and incorporation of mobile search into daily consumer activities continues to drive innovation in paid search, most noticeably with Google enhanced campaigns. Though the impact of enhanced campaigns has been mixed, capitalizing on new revenue opportunities in this multi-device world requires search marketers to remain agile and efficient—focusing their efforts on optimizing for the mobile experience. The following best practices will help advertisers engage their mobile users and acquire more revenue with enhanced campaigns:

  1. Optimize the mobile experience: Ensure that your text-based creative for high-volume groups are optimized for both desktop and mobile devices. For example, your mobile creative text might include geographic modifiers like “New York” or “San Francisco” depending on your location targets.  Mobile-specific call-to-actions such as “Call now” or “Visit a local branch” are also effective in increasing customer engagement.Most importantly, your website should also be optimized to provide specific content for smartphone versus desktop and tablet users. This can be a large project and has important implications for how you present your brand, products, and services. Leveraging responsive web design and being concise with content throughout your site is essential. Making the store locator and other popular landing pages more prominent for smartphone users can reduce bounce rate while facilitating a positive mobile experience.
  2. Establish mobile-specific key performance indicators:  Smartphone users may not interact with your website in the same way as desktop and tablet users, but their visits are still valuable.  Brand-related searches or interest in pricing, availability, or product information may be part of an in-store or near-store purchase process and should be considered intermediate conversion events. Assigning proxy values to these events is critical to understanding engagement and true keyword and device-level ROI, especially when it comes time to calculate optimal bids.
  3. Report on performance by device: Leverage the {device} ValueTrack parameter to ensure that conversions and revenue can be accurately attributed to the device the user clicked and converted from. Depending on your tracking solution and revenue integration, make sure {device} is properly accounted for or tracking issues may occur.
  4. Leverage single-keyword ad groups: By splitting out keywords with significantly different desktop versus mobile performance into separate ad groups, you can calculate group-level mobile bid adjustments that function as keyword-level mobile bid adjustments. When identifying keywords to split out, focus specifically on high volume keywords (thousands of clicks per month) that also vary significantly in desktop versus mobile performance.
  5. Automate mobile bid adjustment calculations: Deploy a bidding solution that automatically calculates optimal group-level mobile bid adjustments based on business goals and requirements. When combined with keyword level bid calculations, this enables you to maximize conversions or revenue across all devices.
  6. Deploy upgraded ad extensions: Google sitelinks provide advertisers with richer, more relevant ads that engage users and enhance brand value and targeted keywords. Leverage campaign and ad group-level sitelinks to enable users to reach deeper and more targeted content on your website. Sitelinks can also dramatically improve click-through rates and conversion rates.

With mobile adoption increasing, it’s no surprise that 70% of mobile searchers use click-to-call. To help facilitate this behavior and increase on-the-go engagement, implement call extensions across your campaigns. Creating a direct way for mobile users to quickly and easily contact your business is an effective strategy for driving customers to your brick-and-mortar locations or guiding them through the conversion funnel. As with all ad extensions, be sure to implement an appropriate call tracking solution to tie back ROI.

Last but not least, Google made a recent update to Ad Rank which now takes into account the expected impact from ad extensions and formats. In other words, ad extensions can now have a positive impact on the position of your ad on the search results page.

Capitalizing on additional revenue opportunities in a new and somewhat untested search landscape will require a comprehensive approach to enhanced campaigns. Continued investment in ad technology and efficient execution of the above best practices will ultimately drive success and win the battle for revenue in this multi-device world.

Remarketing Lists for Search Ads

By September 30th, 2013

Google Adwords Remarketing Retargetting Marin SoftwareIn July, we talked about a new feature that Google was rolling out of beta – Remarketing Lists for Search Ads (RLSA). For those still new to RLSAs, Google is now allowing advertisers to update their bids and creatives to people that have visited their website in the past. We were quite excited to try out this new feature out, see how easy (or hard) it would be to implement, and what the results would look like.

One of the hardest things about managing paid search accounts over time is staying up to date with new Google features and how it all integrates within AdWords. Account structure becomes vital as you look to keep your account organized to manage but also to generate the best possible results. While I mentioned my excitement earlier, I was also slightly stressed out over how difficult it may be to setup and manage results for yet another new campaign and set of rules.

Setup was surprisingly easy, albeit one catch:

  1. Make sure your Remarketing Ads tracking code is active on all the appropriate pages on your website. Build out the audiences that you’d like to track and remarket to. (For example, group the folks looking at shoes differently than those looking at apparel.)
  2. If you want to change your creative for the remarketing ads, you need to create a second duplicate campaign. The original campaign will remain as is, and the new campaign will show to anyone that is part of the cookie pool. I did not account for this originally so I had to go back and do this step.
  3. Once you’ve decided whether you are going to clone your campaign or not for step B, then you can go ahead and start implementing the remarketing campaign. You simply go to the audiences tab and click the +Remarketing button. Choose the ad group you want to use and then add the audience from your website you want to target.
  4. You’ll want to go in and make the appropriate bid adjustment. This works the same way as the enhanced campaigns functionality.
  5. Last but not least, go in and change the creative if you decided to clone the campaign from step B to show different ads.

I think the implementation was fairly easy. Cloning campaigns and creating new ads is simple enough. Again, the hardest part is potentially just managing another new campaign. This gets especially difficult for those of you managing intricate campaigns with hundreds and thousands of campaigns and ad groups.

Without divulging into too much detail on our performance, we’ve seen some good results. With the retargeting lists, we set up bid adjustments of return visitors on key ad groups and upped the bids anywhere from 20-40%. We also updated the copy and, in some cases, the offer. While the CPCs are naturally higher, the CTR and CPL are both improved for a majority if the campaigns. The volume is a lot lower than our main campaigns, but this will be mainly dependent on the number of visitors in your cookie pool.

In all, Google does a great job giving marketers the tools and resources they need to find their customers. This is another win for the advertiser. I hope many of you are taking advantage of this new feature and testing it out to see if it works as well for you. If anyone has any stories, tips, or best practices, we would love to hear them.

Croud Keeps Quality Scores High with Marin Software

By September 27th, 2013

Croud Marin Software PPC Quality Score SEM GoogleFrom time to time Google makes changes to the algorithms that calculate Quality Score. If those changes result in a drop in Quality Score, advertisers are negatively impacted; position is likely to drop and harm the click through rate. Maintaining the same position will likely result in higher CPCs, meaning fewer clicks and conversions within a given budget. Staying on top of Quality Score changes is therefore crucial, but we all know that manually running reports can be time-consuming.

Leading UK agency Croud’s mission is to make digital marketing accessible to all advertisers, regardless of their size and budget. They follow a strict set of best practices designed to keep accounts in tip-top condition. To monitor Quality Score, Croud set up a series of automated alerts using Marin Software’s reporting suite. It was through these alerts that they spotted a recent change in AdWords Quality Score and assessed the impact it had on their accounts. Google does not store historical Quality Score, so without Marin, Croud would not have been able to do this without taking the time to manually record data each day.

Last week, AdWords started reporting lower Quality Scores across many clients. Brand terms and high-volume generic keywords were affected most, and in some instances the drop lasted for two days. By being alerted to this change as soon as it happened, Croud was able to optimize their account accordingly to remain as efficient as possible and manage client expectations.

The Search Marketer’s Guide for Migrating to Google Enhanced Campaigns: Best Practices, Part 2

By July 16th, 2013

willy wonka enhanced capaigns memeLast week we delved into best practices for Google enhanced campaigns, and now we’re back with six more ways to ensure your transition is as seamless and profitable as possible.

 

Best Practice #6 – Use Mobile-Optimized Landing Pages

Make sure to use mobile-optimized landing pages to ensure a good experience for mobile users. If you leverage creative-level destination URLs that direct users to various landing pages, use the {ifmobile} and {ifnotmobile} ValueTrack parameters. For example: {ifmobile:m}{ifnotmobile:www}.marinsoftware.com.

 

Best Practice #7 – Track Conversions and Revenue by Device

Google’s new {device} ValueTrack parameter enables advertisers to track paid search performance by device. If destination URLs are tagged with this parameter, a “c,” “t,” or “m” will be inserted based on the device the user has clicked and converted from. To make use of this new feature, it is critical to migrate your URLs correctly and confirm their function properly. We recommend migrating URLs after merging parent and sibling campaigns in order to reduce the number of URL changes required.

 

Best Practice #8 – Leverage Upgraded Ad Extensions

During a campaign merge, ensure that all ad extensions in sibling campaigns are present in the parent campaign. If your mobile sitelink or call extensions are unique from your desktop ad extensions, you will want to leverage upgraded extensions. Simply specify “Mobile” next to device preferences to customize your extensions for a mobile-optimized experience. Mobile-optimized extensions will be triggered more frequently over standard extensions for searches on mobile devices.

 

Best Practice #9 – Generate Mobile Preferred Creative

If you have creative that specifically target mobile devices, set the device preference to “Mobile” for these creative in the parent campaign. Creative text that contains phones numbers will be disallowed, so use call extensions instead. To make the most of your mobile campaigns, consider creating ads that leverage location identifiers. Finally, remember that mobile-preferred creative are eligible to show on desktop and tablet devices, so you will want to create desktop optimized creative as well.

 

Best Practice #10 – Separate Display Campaigns

At this time, advertisers are not required to merge separate, network-targeted campaigns. Continue to separate search campaigns from display campaigns in order to calculate optimal display mobile bid adjustments based on display performance. “Display Network only” campaigns can still target creative by device models and operating systems.

 

Best Practice #11 – Monitor Performance

Be sure to monitor the performance of your new enhanced campaigns to ensure they are achieving your performance goals and satisfying your business requirements. Generate recurring reports segmented by device, and create alerts to identify significant shifts in key performance indicators. This will allow you to successfully analyze and respond to your campaign results.

 

This concludes our series on best practices for Google enhanced campaigns, but you don’t have to stop there. Download our full guide, “The Search Marketer’s Guide for Migrating to Google Enhanced Campaigns,” for even more information on how to successfully advertise using this new upgrade.

The Search Marketer’s Guide for Migrating to Google Enhanced Campaigns: Best Practices, Part 1

By July 8th, 2013

how to geek mobile ads cartoon

With the July 22, 2013 migration deadline just around the corner, every search marketer is paying close attention to Google enhanced campaigns. We have yet to realize the full impact they will make, but one thing is clear – it is best to migrate early and armed with a plan.

 

To help create your plan of attack, download our white paper, “The Search Marketer’s Guide for Migrating to Google Enhanced Campaigns,” and read on for a selection of 11 best practices from our team of experts here at Marin Software.

 

Best Practice #1 – Maintain Historical Quality Scores

Quality Score estimates reflect a keyword’s overall performance across devices. Therefore, migrating to enhanced campaigns does not result in a loss of historical Quality Score information as long as keyword, creative, landing page, and device combinations remain the same. However, if your device combinations change or if you decide to merge matching campaigns, your Quality Scores will update to an average of the keywords’ original campaign Quality Scores, weighted by search volume.

 

 

Best Practice #2 – Separate Location-Targeted Campaigns

At this time, advertisers are not required to merge separate, location-targeted campaigns. Advertisers that have matching campaigns targeting separate locations should continue to segment these campaigns by location target. This will enable optimal bid calculations based on performance by location, rather than relying on campaign-level location bid adjustments.

 

 

Best Practice #3 – Adjust Campaign Daily Budgets

Upon merging your matching campaigns, your enhanced campaign daily budgets will likely need to be increased due to the additional click volume from expanded device targeting. Add the daily budget of the sibling campaigns to the parent campaign, and review the budget of the parent campaign to ensure it meets your business requirements. You can make adjustments from there based on your goals and the results you’re seeing.

 

 

Best Practice #4 – Calculate Optimal Mobile Bid Adjustments

If you previously separated your campaigns by device target, you can now set a mobile bid adjustment at the campaign or group level to bid on mobile devices separately from desktop and tablet devices. Mobile bid adjustments are set as a percentage of the keyword-level (desktop and tablet) bid. See our white paper for more details on these percentages.

 

 

Best Practice #5 – Utilize Time-of-Day Bid Adjustments

When it comes to scheduling your bids, there are a couple things to remember. First, scheduling reflects the account time zone and not the user’s time zone. Second, scheduling is applied across all devices regardless of performance. Therefore, we recommend applying a bid adjustment that accounts for the average performance between devices.

 

 

Next time: Check back soon to see six more best practices or download the white paper, “The Search Marketers’ Guide for Migrating to Google Enhanced Campaigns,” to get our full guide today.

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