Marketing Insights

Posts Tagged ‘Google updates’

Upgraded URLs – Making It Easier for Paid Search Advertisers to Manage Tracking

By July 14th, 2015

Continuing with our cadence of thought leadership and innovation in digital marketing, Marin Software has successfully upgraded approximately 2 billion URLs to the new Google Upgraded URLs format. We partnered closely with our customers and Google to ensure a smooth transition.

Complete Transparency: Marin’s Upgrade Portal

For visibility into the upgrade process, Marin developed a one of a kind interactive Upgrade Portal. This portal allows customers to quickly and easily review their account configuration and proposed tracking structure before routing changes to Google. As an added bonus, the post-migration summary report within the Upgrade Portal enables customers to keep track of their top performing keywords and ads, and quickly take action within their Marin account(s) to guarantee a timely and successful upgrade.

Ready for a preview of the report tab? See for yourself by watching our two-minute overview video:

Best Practices for the Upgrade

Marin’s Customer Support and Service teams were on hand to assist with any questions that arose during the upgrade process for fast response and inquiry resolution. This experience was specifically designed with our customers in mind!

Through Marin’s close-knit partnership with Google, our customers were upgraded in accordance with Google’s advanced best practices approach – using shared tracking templates at the ad group, campaign, or account levels to benefit from reduced website load when creating new ads or keywords, add new ValueTrack and custom parameters during the upgrade process. Future URL changes can then be made without an interruption to ad serving.

At Marin, we understand that our customer needs are unique. For our customers who chose to self-migrate, Marin had them covered as well! We published comprehensive campaign management and self-migration documentation to Marin’s Enhanced Support Center, along with the archived version of our highest rated webinar to date: Marin’s Best Practices for Managing Upgraded URLs. If you’re a Marin customer please be sure to check this out!

Google Upgraded URLs: the Deadline Approaches

By June 18th, 2015

The June 30th deadline to upgrade your AdWords URLs to the new Upgraded URLs structure is quickly approaching! As mentioned in our previous blog post, Upgraded URLs is a mandatory change to help advertisers track ads and execute updates more efficiently. With Upgraded URLs, you can now separately specify two pieces of information for your URL:

  1. 1) The landing page URL – where the user will go when they click an ad
  2. 2) Your tracking information – the values you’d like to track about your ad performance, which can be at the account level. As a result, you’ll no longer need to update ads, keywords, or sitelinks every time you need to add a tracking parameter to your URLs.

While many marketers have already put together an upgrade strategy for this transition, if you’re still figuring out how to handle your AdWords URLs – it’s not too late. Here are some options and resources to help ensure you’re covered for Upgraded URLs:

  • Auto-migration: If you have very basic URLs (for example, you don’t use any tracking in your URLs), you can either perform the automated upgrade on July 1st, or earlier to get a head start. This method copies your current destination URLs to the new final URL field for all ads and keywords. The benefit of this approach is that you don’t need to do anything; all your ad stats will be maintained, and your ads will not be subject to policy review. However, if your URLs go beyond the basic URL structure, the automated upgrade may not structure your URLs according to best practices.
  • Self-migration: If your URLs include any tracking parameters or use tracking templates, Google provides a self-migration feature. Depending on whether you go with their Basic or Advanced migration, you’ll be able to bulk upload local or shared tracking templates. The Basic migration allows you to create local tracking templates for each of your final URLs. The benefit of the Basic migration is that your ads won’t be subject to policy review, whereas those with Advanced self-migration may be. On the other hand, the Advanced migration allows you to manage shared tracking templates at the ad group, campaign, or account levels. Using the Advanced migration will enable you to try new ValueTrack and custom parameters during the upgrade.
  • Platform help: If you’ve been considering leveraging a 3rd party platform to help you manage your ads, Upgraded URLs presents a great opportunity and reason to try one out. Platforms such as Marin have provided customers with migration resources to help alleviate the stress of making the upgrade, and to minimize any potential disruptions to workflows. Currently, for new customers, Marin is providing Upgraded URLs migration services as part of the onboarding process prior to July 1st. With this approach, you get the assurance that your URLs will be migrated according to best practices. And, you’ll be able to enjoy the benefits of platform support for ongoing management of your ads.

With all the options you have available for Upgraded URLs, it’s important to review your Google ads to determine which approach works best for your business.

Top 3 Takeaways from Google’s AdWords Livestream 2015

By May 6th, 2015

Yesterday morning at Google’s AdWords Livestream 2015, the AdWords team announced several exciting new features. The features they’ll be launching fall into three broad categories: ad experiences, automation, and measurement. Here’s a run-down of each:

1. Ad Experiences- Creating experiences for consumers when they’re looking for your business

For Automobile Ads, Hotel Ads, Shopping Ads, and Comparison Ads the big theme across all is an emphasis on interactive. Google is releasing a number of enhancements to the creative formats for different verticals by making them more interactive, with a greater emphasis on images and integration with mobile apps. With these enhancements, Google is looking to move advertising beyond just text ads, which are the most common ad format today. This is an understandable move, as ads containing images are proven to drive higher levels of user engagement, according to eMarketer, with a 28% growth in clicks for image-based ads versus just 4% for text ads in Q2 of 2014.

2. Automation – Accelerate, customize, and scale your activity in AdWords

In today’s world, advertisers need to manually create campaigns and set bids for Dynamic Search Ads. Google acknowledges that this can be a cumbersome task that is difficult to scale for advertisers with expansive keyword sets. With the launch of the new Dynamic Search Ads, an improved workflow will allow advertisers to simply type in a URL and view recommended CPCs provided for their categories. Additionally, the introduction of automation into the DSA workflow demonstrates Google’s intentions of moving away from keywords and towards more macro targeting. Google has also announced auto-resizing of GDN ads to help advertisers save time and make it easier for them to reach their audience through Display. For bidding, Google is launching a CPA bid simulation report that will allow advertisers to simulate bids for target CPAs on search and display, as well as an enhanced bid strategy dashboard in the Shared library that will allow advertisers to review the status of their bid strategies over time.

3. Measurement – Measure every moment that matters, across touch points and devices

To provide advertisers with the full value of digital and insight into their advertising performance across devices, Google is enhancing their analytics and reporting capabilities. These new capabilities will allow for better conversion and attribution tracking across devices. The first step in this process will be the integration of Estimated Total Conversions (ETC) to bidding to help inform better bidding and budgeting decisions. Later this year, advertisers will be able to take action on cross-device conversions for automated bidding and to include cross-device conversions as part of the conversions column in AdWords. The goal is to provide advertisers with the ability to track cross-device conversions that started on the web and finished on the app, regardless of device type. Attribution was also discussed, with the integration of data driven attribution into AdWords to make attribution actionable for Search. This integration will allow you to break down the customer journey and measure every moment using your own conversion data to value attribution. This will allow Google to calculate the actual contribution of every keyword in your account and optimize for the best performing keywords across the conversion path. Coupling this new feature with automated bidding will allow you to optimize keyword bids based on the actual value of your Search ads.

All these new enhancements are planned to roll out over the course of the next few months so stayed tuned to Marketing Insights for more updates as we provide all the details you need to you know as they launch.

Google Exact Keyword Match Changes: Everything You Need to Know

By August 20th, 2014

Last Thursday, Google announced that exact keyword match will now include close variant keywords as well. Many of you may be wondering what this means for your campaigns and what action is required on your part. We’re here to assure that there is no reason to panic!

For some background, advertisers currently have two options when it comes to matching ads to search queries: 1.) Only show the ad when the query exactly matched the keywords they set up in AdWords, or 2.) Allow Google to also match the ad to keywords and phrases that are very similar to the original one, including variations like plurals or misspellings. Starting in late September, the first option is going away and Google will always automatically include all of these close variants when it tries to match an ad to a search query. Today’s announcement only applies to what Google calls the “phrase match” and “exact match” options. As the name implies, exact match only shows the ad when the query exactly matched the keyword (e.g. “women’s hats”), while phrase match also shows it when the query includes other words (e.g. “buy women’s hats”).

While this change may initially be perceived as burdensome to Google advertisers who prefer tight control over their exact and phrase matched keywords, it does offer some benefit to advertisers. Namely, following the September update, Google advertisers will no longer have to build long lists of misspelled, abbreviated, and other close variations of keywords to get the coverage they want. Therefore, this update can help Google advertisers better manage keyword complexity across large Search programs.

Although Google is marketing this change as a benefit to advertisers, Marin recommends that our advertisers closely monitor their campaigns to determine how the September changes will impact their overall performance.

Google Embraces the Marin “Cloner”

By January 3rd, 2013

Marin Campaign Cloner

In 2008, Marin unveiled the industry’s first “Cloner.” Eliminating tedious manual efforts in spreadsheets, the Cloner allows advertisers to quickly copy campaigns in order to replicate campaign settings and keyword targeting across geographies and devices. With the touch of a button, campaigns, budgets, ad groups, keywords, and creative are instantly duplicated, saving search marketers countless hours each week.

Today, Google took a giant leap forward embracing tools vendors and the innovative idea behind the Marin Cloner. Until now, the AdWords API Terms and Conditions have restricted vendors from cloning campaigns from Google to competing engines such as Yahoo! or Bing. This morning, Google announced a change to their terms and conditions which allows for cloning across engines, providing advertisers with true portability for their campaign data and the ability to more easily manage ad campaigns across search engines.

Search marketers will no doubt be excited by this move, as they can now avoid the duplicate efforts required to manage identical campaigns across Google, Yahoo!, and Bing. But this change is good for more than marketers mental health! Ensuring data portability is good for the industry, because it puts marketers in control. Using tools like Marin, marketers can now more easily measure, manage, and optimize digital advertising campaigns across channels, publishers and devices from a single platform.

Look for this change to unlock a sea of innovative features which are yet to come, benefiting advertisers, publishers, tools providers, and yes, even Google as marketers see higher returns on their integrated marketing campaigns.

Google Allows Users to Mute Display Ads

By June 29th, 2012

This morning, Google announced a new feature that will be rolling out across display ads over the next few weeks. In the upper right corner of select ads, a small [X] will now appear allowing users to click and “mute” ads from that campaign from being shown to them again. Google believes that this will be a win-win-win within the display ecosystem: users control their ad experience, advertisers don’t pay to show irrelevant ads and publishers display better performing ads.

Google Display Ad Mute Feature








Based on what Google is telling us, one irrelevant ad could cost online marketers from showing ads in an entire campaign ever again to that particular user. It seems extreme to prevent all ads within the campaign from showing again, rather than just the group containing the muted ad. However, the same ad could be shown again by a different ad company, or the marketer could run a separate campaign targeting specific content. Though muting isn’t a 100% guarantee that users won’t see that ad again, one thing is for certain, online marketers will need to ensure, now more than ever, that their display campaigns are focused and highly relevant. Hopefully, user engagement with this new feature and changes in ad performance will dictate future updates, if any.

For best practices on managing and optimizing contextually keyword targeted display campaigns, read part 1 and part 2 of our You, Google and the Display Network series.


Find us on Facebook